Image Credit: GEPA

The FIS has officially approved the 2019-20 WC calendars after their spring conference concluded last week in Croatia. In total, the women’s tour stops at 22 resorts across 13 different countries for a total of 42 competitions if all goes according to plan. The men’s circuit touches down at 23 various resorts across 14 countries for a total of 46 events in the 2019/20 season.

The men’s Tour kicks off with the traditional Soelden opening giant slalom on October 27 before taking almost a month break before returning to Levi, Finland, for the opening slalom race of the season on November 24. The speed season kicks off the following weekend with downhill and super-G races in Lake Louise, Canada, before heading south for the now-famous Birds of Prey races in Beaver Creek, Colorado, December 6-8.

After the Tour’s North American swing, racing returns to Europe on December 14-15 in Val d’Isere, France and looks not unlike many of the past seasons through the rest of 2019 and into 2020. The usual suspects of Val Gardena, Alta Badia, Bormio, Zagreb, Madonna di Campiglio, Adelboden, Wengen, Kitzbuehel, and Schladming all make appearances on the calendar. Worth noting, however, is the night slalom in Madonna scheduled to take place in between the races in Zagreb and Adelboden on January 8 and not in December like in seasons past.

Turn your calendar to February and things get a little more interesting for the men. After the traditional stop for downhill and GS racing in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, the men return to Chamonix, France, for the first time since the 2016 season for slalom and parallel races February 8-9. The Tour then packs its bags and heads back to Asia for the Olympic test downhill and super-G races in Yanqing, China, February 15-16. The tech racers will be in Yuzawa Naeba, Japan, for slalom and GS racing on February 22-23.

After the Asian stops on the Tour, racing returns to Europe for the remainder of the season, with stops in Hinterstoder, Austria, Kvitfjell, Norway, Stockholm, Sweden, and Kranjska Gora, Slovenia, highlighted by World Cup Finals in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy, March 18-22 as the Italian venue continues their preparations to host the World Championships in 2021.

To view the complete men’s calendar, click here.

The women kick off the season in Soelden a day prior to the men, competing in the giant slalom on October 26. Next, they also head to Levi for the slalom season opener to be held on November 23. Thanksgiving weekend, the women’s Tour will return once again to Killington, Vermont, for slalom and GS racing. The Eastern resort has booked the Tour through 2020 and hopes to continue its streak as the largest spectator stop on the women’s side. Last year, the event capped out at 39,000 people who made the trip to cheer on international and domestic competitors alike across the span of three days.

From Killington, the women trade off with the men to kick off the speed season in Lake Louise from December 6-8, followed by a super-G and parallel event held in St. Moritz, Switzerland, the following weekend. Next up on the December docket is Courchevel, France, on Tuesday the 17th for a GS event. The women’s series in Val d’Isere is bumped back a weekend, a slight change up from the 2018-19 schedule. A downhill race is to be held on the 21st, followed by an alpine combined race on the 22nd. The December stretch of the tour ends for the women in Lienz, Austria, with a post-holiday tech series on the 28-29.

January jump starts in Zagreb, Croatia, with a slalom race on the 4th, followed by a speed series in Zauchensee, Austria on the 11-12. Next, the women compete in the first night event of the season, the slalom in Flachau, Austria. From there a GS and parallel event are to be held in Sestriere, Italy, a stop that did not make an appearance on the tour in the 2018-19 season. January wraps for the ladies in Bansko, Bulgaria, with a downhill on the 25th and a super-G on the 26th.

Rounding the corner into February, the 1st and 2nd will see another speed series in Rosa Khutor, Russia, then yet another speed series on the challenging Kandahar run in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, that saw many top athletes succumb to injury this past season. The tech series in Maribor, Slovenia, is up next on the 15th and 16th of February, followed by Crans-Montana, Switzerland, where a downhill event will take place on the 22nd, followed by an alpine combined on the 23rd. On the 29th, La Thuile, Italy, will host a super-G, followed by the fourth and final alpine combined event on the 1st of March.

In early March, the women will stop in Ofterschwang, Germany, for a tech series before heading to Stockholm for a parallel event on the 10th. The 13th and 14th of the month, Are, Sweden, home to last year’s World Championship competitions, hosts a GS night event alongside a slalom. Finally, the women’s tour also wraps in Cortina d’Ampezzo for World Finals, where the top 25 ladies in each discipline will compete for the final time for crystal globes in the 2019-20 season.

To view the complete women’s calendar, click here.

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Sean Higgins and Mackenzie Moran
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